2016 Most Affordable Colleges in Nevada

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Nevada has a limited selection of universities and colleges, and the most affordable ones tend to be big public schools. Overall, there isn’t a lot in the way of state financial aid for Nevada residents, although low-income students and high-achieving high school graduates have a decent chance of getting good money for Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) institutions. Nevada also participates in the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE), which means you may be able to attend out-of-state schools at reduced tuition rates.

How to Transfer College Credits in Nevada

College students in Nevada benefit from good statewide college credit transfer policies including a transferable core of lower division courses, statewide common course numbering, and statewide guaranteed transfer of associate’s degrees. Plus, Nevada offers a reverse transfer that enables students to earn an associate’s degree for completed course work.

To facilitate transfer of courses between colleges in the Nevada System of Higher Education, all undergraduate courses are required to follow common course numbering. Courses that may not transfer to bachelor’s degree programs typically use a B suffix to indicate their restriction.

The Nevada System of Higher Education requires all bachelor’s degrees at universities and colleges within the state to have transfer agreements with public community colleges in Nevada. The schools must provide clear information for community college students to indicate which courses will transfer within each major.

Nevada allows for an automatic transfer of credits earned at community colleges toward degrees at state colleges or universities. All credits earned toward the completion of an associate’s degree must transfer as well. If credit is denied, students must be granted an appeal.

Students who transfer with Nevada System of Higher Education associate’s degree of arts, business, science, or applied science will be considered to have satisfied all of the lower division general curriculum requirements for a four year degree. These students will be admitted with full junior status. Additionally, students who posses a transferable associate’s degree from a community college in the Nevada System of Higher Education are offered admission to Nevada public universities, regardless of their community college GPA.

With Nevada’s reverse transfer program, students have a degree completion opportunity. This program is designed for students who started their education at a community college and transferred to a four year institution before completing an associate’s degree. Under the program, students are able to transfer credits from the four year institution to the community college in order to meet the requirements for an associate’s degree and be awarded the credential.

State Financial Aid for Nevada Students

The Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) is responsible for administering state aid to residents, including the popular Governor Guinn Millennium Scholarship. Since a lot of state aid is limited to NSHE institutions (e.g. UNR, UNLV, NSC, etc.), we recommend you visit the financial aid section on the website of your prospective NSHE school to see what grants and scholarships are currently available.

Another website to bookmark is Go to College Nevada. This is aimed at parents and students, and includes advice on College Preparation (e.g. high school planning, College Application Month), profiles of affordable Nevada Colleges and tips on Paying for College.

Saving up? The Nevada State Treasurer has a list of college savings programs, such as the Nevada Prepaid Tuition Program and the Nevada College Savings Plans (CSP) Program. If you’re looking for scholarships and grants awarded by institutions or private funders (i.e. not the state), the Nevada State Grant Office also has a helpful Nevada Grant and Scholarship List.

Nevada Student Grants

Nevada Grants-in-Aid (NGIA)

Summary: NSHE allocates various state funds to NSHE institutions for both resident students (i.e. in-state awards) and non-resident students (i.e. out-of-state awards). Awards for Nevada residents include Native American/Tribal Grants-in-Aid (TGIA) to members of federally recognized tribes within Nevada.

Award amounts vary. Out-of-state awards may cover the difference between non-resident tuition and resident tuition.

Eligibility: Requirements vary depending on the type of award. See Section T4-CH18 – Financial Aid of the Board of Regents Handbook for descriptions.

How to Apply: Contact the Financial Aid Office at your choice of NSHE institution to see if you are eligible for any of these grants.

Nevada State Access Grant (NSAG)

Summary: Funded by both state and institutional sources, access grants are awarded to Nevada students who are studying in-state and demonstrate a high level of need (based on their FAFSA application).

Award amounts are determined by a student’s EFC and number of credits taken in a term. Grants are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis, so apply as early as you can!

Eligibility: You must:

  • Be a resident of Nevada
  • Be enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate program at a Nevada institution
  • Demonstrate financial need (based on FAFSA information)

How to Apply: File your FAFSA and contact the Financial Aid Office at your choice of Nevada institution.

Silver State Opportunity Grant (SSOG)

Summary: This is a need-based grant awarded to low-income Nevada students who attend an NSHE community college or state college. This category excludes UNR and UNLV

Grant aid is based on the total cost of attendance—including tuition & fees, books & supplies, room & board and other living expenses—being shared by partners (the state, federal government, family and the student). See the SSOG webpage for details.

Eligibility: You must:

  • Be a resident of Nevada
  • Be enrolled in a program of study (at least 15 credit hours) leading to a degree or certificate at an NSHE community college or state college
  • Be “college-ready” based on placement or completion of entry-level, college-level mathematics and English
  • Have an Expected Family Contribution (EFC) of 8500 or less (based on FAFSA information)

The SSOG webpage has more details on renewing the award and maintaining eligibility.

How to Apply: File your FAFSA as early as possible.

Nevada Student Scholarships

Governor Guinn Millennium Scholarship (GGMS)

Summary: This scholarship is award to high-achieving Nevada high school students. Students from both public or private high schools in Nevada are eligible.

GGMS will pay $80 per credit at eligible universities, $60 per credit at NSHE state colleges and $40 per credit for 9 to 12 credits at NSHE community colleges. The maximum total award is $10,000.

Eligibility: You must:

  • Be a resident of Nevada for at least two of your high school years
  • Complete core curriculum requirements in high school
  • Finish high school with a cumulative 3.25 GPA for all coursework (or a sufficient ACT or SAT score)
  • Enroll in an pre-baccalaureate certificate, associate’s degree or bachelor’s degree program at an eligible institution of higher education in Nevada
  • Complete a minimum number of credits each semester (9 credits for an NSHE community college; 12 credits at other institutions)

The GGMS webpage has answers to GGMS FAQs and more info about applying, accepting and maintaining your award eligibility.

How to Apply: There is no separate application form for this program. The school district will submit your name and high school courses completed to the Nevada State Treasurer’s Office. Eligible students are then notified by the Nevada State Treasurer’s Office.

Kenny C. Guinn Memorial Millennium Scholarship

Summary: The GGMS program also offers additional scholarships to two qualified Gov. Guinn Millennium Scholars (one each in Northern and Southern Nevada) who are majoring in elementary or secondary education and intend to teach in Nevada.

Eligibility: You must:

  • Be an eligible Millennium Scholar
  • Be entering your senior or last year of college with 90+ credits at an eligible institution
  • Be enrolled in and remain enrolled in a course of study leading to licensure in elementary or secondary education
  • Maintain a college GPA of not less than 3.5 on a 4.0 grading scale
  • State a commitment to teaching in Nevada upon graduation
  • Have a commendable record of community service

How to Apply: Complete the Governor Guinn Memorial Millennium Scholarship Application.

Nevada Student Loans & Repayment Programs

WICHE Health Care Access Program (HCAP)

Summary: To combat a shortage of healthcare professionals in Nevada, Nevada WICHE has set aside certain funds for students enrolled in pharmacy and physician assistant programs (out-of-state), nursing and physical therapy programs (in-state). There are also loan repayment programs for dentists, mental health professionals and nurses.

The Nevada WICHE Program webpage has a fact sheet with annual award amounts. Awards are paid directly to the school on your behalf and enable you to attend at reduced tuition rates. Loan repayment funds are paid to your lending institution.

Eligibility: To be eligible for any of these funds, you must:

  • Agree to work in Nevada and practice in a medically underserved region or with a medically underserved population for two years (nurses may be exempt from the underserved requirement)
  • Repay 10% of the total support within 5-10 years of graduation (psychology interns are exempt)

If you fail to fulfill the service requirement, you may have to pay a penalty of triple principle plus interest of funds.

How to Apply: Complete the HCAP Tuition Assistance Program Application, available through Nevada WICHE.

WICHE Professional Student Exchange Program (PSEP)

Summary: Nevada WICHE runs a loan forgiveness program for students enrolled in pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant or veterinary medicine programs at WICHE-participating schools.

The Nevada WICHE Program webpage has a fact sheet with annual award amounts. Awards are paid directly to the school on your behalf and enable you to attend at reduced tuition rates.

Eligibility: To be eligible for these funds, you must:

  • Be a Nevada resident for at least one year prior to applying
  • Agree to return to & remain in Nevada and practice in your profession for four years
  • Repay 25% of the total support as a loan within 5-10 years of graduation

If you fail to fulfill the service requirement, you may have to pay back the total amount in the same manner as the 25% loan repayment.

How to Apply: Complete the PSEP Tuition Assistance Program Application, available through Nevada WICHE.

Education Assistance for Nevada Military & Veterans

Grant-in-Aid for the Family of a Member Killed in the Line of Duty

Summary: The state has set aside in-state award money for financially dependent children and spouses of an active duty member of the U.S. Armed Forces killed in the line of duty while permanently stationed in Nevada.

Grants-in-aid are available at NSHE institutions.

Eligibility: You must:

  • Be a resident of Nevada
  • Be an eligible dependent or spouse
  • Attend an NSHE institution

How to Apply: Contact the Financial Aid Office at your choice of school for more info.

National Guard 100% Tuition Waiver

Summary: The University of Nevada System (NSHE) offers a 100% tuition waiver to all members of the Nevada Army National Guard at all state universities and community colleges. There is no limit on number of credits taken; students can be part-time or full-time.

The waiver covers 100% of tuition, excluding some laboratory and university fees. Programs associated with the William S. Boyd School of Law, the University of Nevada School of Medicine and the UNLV School of Dental Medicine are not eligible for waiver.

Eligibility: You must:

  • Be a current or newly recruited Nevada Army National Guard member in good standing
  • Achieve a minimum 2.00 GPA each semester in order to maintain eligibility

How to Apply: Talk to your unit commander about the application procedure.

National Guard Waiver for Children & Spouse

Summary: The National Guard 100% tuition waiver is also available to children or the spouse of a person who was killed while performing duties as a member of the Nevada National Guard.

The waiver covers 100% of tuition, excluding some laboratory and university fees. Programs associated with the William S. Boyd School of Law, the University of Nevada School of Medicine and the UNLV School of Dental Medicine are not eligible for waiver.

Eligibility: You must:

  • Be an eligible dependent of a Nevada National Guard member
  • Achieve a minimum 2.00 GPA each semester in order to maintain eligibility

Children have ten years to use the waiver (after they turn 18 or after the date of enrollment); spouses have ten years from the member’s date of death.

How to Apply: Talk to your school’s Financial Aid Office about the application procedure.

Non-Resident Tuition Exemptions: Veterans, Active Military & Family

Summary: NSHE institutions offer resident tuition rates (i.e. in-state tuition) to certain categories of military, including:

  • Out-of-state veterans who were honorably discharged within five years preceding the date of matriculation.
  • Qualifying veterans and their eligible family members who enroll in an NSHE institution within three years of discharge from a period of active duty service of 90 days or more.
  • Active duty members of the U.S. Armed Forces stationed in Nevada, as well as their spouses and dependent children.
  • Veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces who were honorably discharged and who on the date of discharge were on active duty stationed in Nevada.

Eligibility: Please see the NSHE webpage on Veterans for eligibility details.

How to Apply: Contact the Financial Aid Office at your choice of school for application procedures.

POW/MIA Benefits for Children & Spouse

Summary: NSHE institutions provide a 100% tuition waiver to the children or spouse of a member of the U.S. Armed Forces who was permanently stationed in Nevada and has been identified as a prisoner of war (POW) or missing in action (MIA).

The waiver covers 100% of tuition, excluding some laboratory and university fees. Programs associated with the William S. Boyd School of Law, the University of Nevada School of Medicine and the UNLV School of Dental Medicine are not eligible for waiver.

Eligibility:

  • Be an eligible dependent of a Nevada POW or MIA
  • Achieve a minimum 2.00 GPA each semester in order to maintain eligibility

Children have ten years to use the waiver (after they turn 18 or after the date of enrollment); spouses have ten years from the member being identified as a POW or MIA.

How to Apply: Contact the Financial Aid Office at your choice of school for application procedures.

The Nevada Department of Veterans Services (NDVS) can also provide info on military education benefits, including federal aid (e.g. GI Bill), scholarships for veterans and dependents, apprenticeship programs, employment services and more.

Additional Support for Nevada Students

Nevada Regents Service Program

Summary: This state-funded, work-study program provides paid internships and employment placements to students in NSHE institutions. Work opportunities must be service-oriented and reflect a high level of skill or knowledge. They should also make a contribution to the university, the state or the surrounding community.

The state of Nevada pays 100% of a student’s salary.

Eligibility: Eligibility requirements are established by each NSHE institution, so contact the Work Study Program unit or the Financial Aid Office at your school for details.

How to Apply: File your FAFSA and talk to the Financial Aid Office at your choice of NSHE institution.

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) Programs

Summary: Nevada takes part in WICHE’s student exchange programs, which allow Nevada residents to pay reduced tuition rates at schools & programs outside of the state. WICHE initiatives include the:

Please see our Loans section for details on the Professional Student Exchange Program (PSEP) and Health Care Access Program (HCAP) for Nevada residents.

Eligibility: Eligibility requirements vary depending on the program. Visit the WICHE program webpage for more details.

How to Apply: Visit the WICHE program webpage for application procedures. You will usually need to contact a participating WICHE college or university and identify yourself as a WICHE applicant.

Cheaper College Living in Nevada

Going to college can have a huge impact on your family budget. We discuss various ways to save money in our sections below, but we know that bills can pile up.

When you need serious help, Nevada’s Department of Welfare and Supportive Services (DWSS) may be able to assist. Its benefit programs for low-income residents include SNAP (food stamps), energy assistance, child care assistance, Medicaid, temporary assistance for needy families and more.

Even if you’re not eligible for government benefits, you still have options. Call 2-1-1 or visit the website of Nevada 211 and search for services. Run by United Way, 211 is a free service that connects residents to support programs in their local area. 211 counselors can refer you to cheap child care, free food, affordable health care, utility assistance programs, help with transportation—you name it.

Alternatively, you can talk to someone in your county’s Community Action Agency (CAA) about your challenge. CAAs were especially created to serve low-income residents.

On-Campus Housing

The cost of campus housing is going to depend on your school, your dorm building and your willingness to tolerate roommates! Some students like that utilities are usually included, rooms are furnished, buildings are up-to-code and they don’t need to pay for commuting costs. On the other hand, campus housing is one place where universities love to push up prices. For instance, SNC gets good reviews for its amenities (e.g. personal bathrooms), but those perks come with higher annual rates.

If you’d like to know how much dorms are really going to cost you, try using the budget calculators on sites like Yahoo.com and CalcXML.com to compare on-campus costs (meal plans, dorm fees, etc.) with off-campus bills (groceries, utilities, etc.). You can find the latest housing rates on your university’s website.

It also pays to remember that some universities have a housing requirement. For example, UNLV insists that many freshmen to stay in resident halls; SNC requires most full-time freshman and sophomores to live in residence halls. If you go to a private university or rural college, dorms may be the norm. To save money in later years, you may wish to consider becoming a Resident Assistant (RA).

Worried that your financial aid package won’t cover housing? Talk to your high school counselor, the Financial Aid Office and/or the residential life coordinator at your university before you take out student loans for room & board. They will often have info on housing scholarships and work-study programs that can help you tackle bills. For instance, Clark County high school graduates can apply for a Clark County Housing Scholarship at UNLV.

Off-Campus Housing

If you choose to go to a community college or commuter school like NSC, off-campus housing may be your only choice. That means having to find funds for utility bills, renter’s insurance, security deposits, commuting and more.

To save money in these situations, some students opt to stay at home for all four years. Others choose to go a community college nearby and transfer to a university out of town after their sophomore year. Apartments that are farther from campus are generally cheaper. You might also look at sharing with multiple roommates or finding affordable places that rent by the room.

First time renting? Check out the housing section on your university’s websites. Schools are usually very helpful about providing tips, resources and links to listings. For example, UNR has an Off-Campus Housing webpage with access to legal advice; UNLV’s Off-Campus Housing has a list of local housing providers. You can also try Craigslist, campus-focused rental sites (e.g. CampusRent.com, MyApartmentMap.com, OffCampus.com, etc.), messageboards and word of mouth.

Homeless or about to be evicted? HUD.gov has a list of places to get rental help and contact details for Shelters and Emergency Housing in Nevada. You can compare this list with Nevada Homeless Shelters directory on HomelessShelterDirectory.org.

Utilities

Before you sign any lease or rental agreement, be sure you know what utilities you’ll be expected to cover. Although utilities in Nevada are below the national average, heating and air conditioning costs in the desert can be downright nasty. To get a sense of how much you’ll need to budget, ask your prospective landlord or the individual utility company for a monthly estimate of bills. Former renters will also have good advice.

Struggling with bills? If you already own your home or are living in a rental, you may be eligible for utility assistance programs. The Energy Assistance Program (EAP) may be the most well-known one—it’s run by the DWSS. But residents aren’t always aware that utility companies themselves offer help. For example, NV Energy has a variety of Assistance Programs (e.g. SAFE, third-party protection, etc.) and Southwest Gas has a Deferred Payment Program. Your local Salvation Army post can refer you to programs in your area.

Medical & Dental

The first place to go for affordable healthcare services is your campus health center. These centers are funded by student fees, so feel free to use them! Centers will typically offer basic medical care (e.g. immunizations, family planning, women’s health, treatment of minor injuries, etc.). Big schools may even offer services like sports medicine, dermatology and mental health counseling (e.g. UNLV’s CAPS). You may also wish to see if your university offers discount student health insurance.

When you run into more complicated problems, you can ask the student health center for referrals or you can try low-cost clinics in your area. Nevada Health Centers is the largest provider of primary care for uninsured, underinsured and/or geographically isolated residents and it has a list of community health clinics (CHCs) throughout Nevada. Volunteers in Medicine of Southern Nevada (VMSN) provides similar service to Southern Nevadans. Many of these clinics also provide affordable mental healthcare. The Mental Health Crisis/Suicide hotline is 1-800-273-8255.

For cheap dental care, ask your community action agency, a Nevada Health Center or your student health center for referrals to dentists. Or you can search the Nevada Oral Health Resource Guide from Oral Health Nevada. This provides information on dental programs in Nevada that provide low-cost or free dental care. Some students turn to schools of dentistry (e.g. UNLV School of Dental Medicine) or dental hygiene for treatment. Because these schools are training new dentists, they’re often willing to offer patients reduced rates on major dental care.

Child Care

You’ll find daycare facilities at UNR, UNLV and many other Arkansas chools, but competition for spots can be fierce. To have the best shot at getting a place for your kid, try to apply as early as you can. While you’re there, you might also ask about childcare scholarships, discounts or subsidies for student parents. For example, UNR’s Graduate Student Association (GSA) has a GSA Child Care Scholarship and UNLV has a similar Graduate Access Childcare Scholarship.

Low-income families may also be eligible for state and federal benefits (e.g. Head Start). Although the waiting list for the DWSS’s Child Care Subsidy Program can be long, it’s worth considering. In addition, the Children’s Cabinet has listed a variety of ways to find Help Paying for Child Care and to Search for Licensed Child Care Providers in most counties. However, families seeking child care in Clark or Nye County should go through the Las Vegas Urban League (LVUL).

Transportation

Nevada is the land of bikes, buses and cars. Public transportation in Las Vegas is notoriously sketchy and UNLV students who commute often drive their own vehicles. Other Nevadans choose to stick to dorms and campus living—UNR students use the Campus Escort system when they want to go within a two mile radius outside of the university.

Whatever choice you make about wheels, take a minute or two to visit the transportation/transit section of your university’s website. It won’t have bells and whistles, but it will have info on parking discounts, campus shuttles, carpools, bike rental programs, Zipcars and more. For example, UNR students who find alternate transportation are eligible for free parking permits.

Having a valid college ID will also entitle you to discounts from transit companies. UNR and TMCC students who purchase passes get free, unlimited rides on RTC RIDE buses throughout Reno/Sparks. RTC offers transit passes to UNLV, CSN and NSC students, and members of its Club Ride program are eligible to receive free money and local discounts. Amtrak, Greyhound and other national carriers knock the price off regular tickets for students.

Food

In response to the hunger crisis among students, UNR and UNLV have opened food pantries on campus. UNR also participates in the Free Food Finder, which lets students search for campus events with free food. Please don’t be afraid to talk to the Financial Aid Office if you can’t afford to eat. There may be ways to reduce your meal plan costs, receive leftover food from dining services or get a job in the kitchens.

Your community will also be there for you. Food Bank of Northern Nevada has a directory of Emergency Food Pantries and Mobile Harvest programs for neighborhoods in the northern counties; Three Square serves four counties in Southern Nevada (Clark, Nye, Lincoln and Esmeralda) and can help you find a community pantry or community meal in your area.

Plus, even if you aren’t eligible for SNAP (food stamps), your family may qualify for programs like WIC, the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP). Call 2-1-1 for more assistance.

SEE ALSO: our Encyclopedic Guide to Saving Money as a College Student.

Find Support in Your Area

College in Las Vegas on a Budget

Despite its outsize reputation, Las Vegas is a moderately affordable town (compared to other big cities). Sperling’s Best Places notes that the overall cost of living is around the national average; housing prices aren’t bad, but violent crime rates are high and you’ll need to think about air conditioning bills in the brutal summer heat. The Strip isn’t far from the UNLV campus and is full of tourists, which can be good for part-time job opportunities (e.g. bartending) as long as you have a car. If you get tired of cheap entertainment everywhere you look, you can hike for free in the Valley of Fire, Lake Mead National Recreation Area and Red Rock Canyon.

Where to Go for Help in Las Vegas

Las Vegas is full of community organizations that are committed to helping Clark County residents get to college. We’ve listed a few programs that offer scholarships, tutoring and training, but there are more out there!

  • The Nevada Community Foundation (NCF) offers college scholarships to local students. Talk to your high school counselor or NCF for more information on how to apply.
  • Nevada Partners, Inc. (NPI) is a community-based, non-profit agency that provides youth programs (e.g. exam tutoring/preparation), workforce development (e.g. career counseling), affordable housing assistance and free tax return preparation and e-filing. Check out their list of programs.
  • The Quiet Storm Foundation supports Las Vegas high school students with an out-of-school program, a youth advisory council with career and college preparation, an annual college scholarship program and more.
  • Batteries Included is a collaboration between the city of Las Vegas, the Clark County School District and Nevada Partners. The program helps students focus on leadership and character development, health and wellness and career building. The program finishes with an “Employability Olympics,” which connects program graduates to local employer and summer job opportunities.
  • Desert Rose Adult High School for adult learners has all kinds of classes, including high school diploma or GED classes, vocational classes, positive parenting workshops, proficiency exam tutoring and community service opportunities.

Are you grappling with a specific challenge (e.g. utility payments, healthcare bills, homelessness, etc.)? You can call 2-1-1 or visit the homepage of Nevada 211 to conduct a quick search for services. The City of Las Vegas has more general info for residents (e.g. affordable housing opportunities).

College in Henderson on a Budget

Home to NSC, Henderson is quieter and more expensive than its next-door neighbor, Las Vegas. The overall cost of living is above the national average, thanks mainly to higher housing prices. Having said that, most students are able to find cheap rents if they look hard enough. That’s important because NSC has no dorms. The campus itself is in the middle of nowhere, but the Strip is 15 minutes away by car and the area has 80+ miles of hiking, biking and horseback riding trails.

Where to Go for Help in Henderson

If you live in Henderson or the Clark County area, there are number of non-profits that can help you achieve your dreams of college. We also recommend you look at the list under Las Vegas, since many of these organizations serve much of Southern Nevada.

Are you wrestling with a specific challenge (e.g. utility payments, healthcare bills, homelessness, etc.)? You can call 2-1-1 or visit the homepage of Nevada 211 to conduct a quick search for services. The City of Henderson has more general info for residents (e.g. bike routes).

College in Reno on a Budget

Reno is cheaper than Henderson but more expensive than Vegas. Housing costs are above the national average, but utilities are relatively inexpensive. (Off-campus housing tends to be pricey near campus.) Transportation is fairly cheap and easy—UNR students have access to the shuttle service and the Campus Escort, and a public bus around downtown. The city has the feel of a college town and there are hundreds of great restaurants and cool events & festivals. If you’ve got access to a car, your free recreation opportunities include the mountains, forests and Lake Tahoe.

Where to Go for Help in Reno

If you need assistance getting to college or completing higher education, there are a lot of Reno organizations that are willing to lend a hand. We’ve listed a sample; talk to your high school counselor or career mentor for more ideas!

Are you struggling with a specific challenge (e.g. heating payments, healthcare bills, homelessness, etc.)? You can call 2-1-1 or visit the homepage of Nevada 211 to conduct a quick search for services. The City of Reno has more general info for residents (e.g. utility information).

School Rankings

1

University of Nevada-Reno

Home to one of the country's most technologically advanced libraries (Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center) as well as majestic 100-year old trees, the University of Nevada Reno is where learning takes place at the nexus of history and the 21st century. The Presidential Scholarship awards $5,000 per year to entering freshmen with exceptional academic credentials. UNR is a partner institution that assists in the grant selection and disbursement process of TEACH (Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education). The grant provides up to $4,000 to students who are planning to teach in a high-needs field in an under-served school district. Incoming UNR Biology majors with financial need may apply for the Freeman Scholarship, which is worth approximately $1,100 and is non-renewable.

Accreditation: Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities

CAG Score 93.5

  • Advanced Placement Credit
  • DSST Credit
  • CLEP Credit
  • ROTC Program

19,934 Students

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